"House Approves Bill to Stop Law Enforcement from Purchasing Online Records for Privacy"

House passed the "Fourth Amendment Is Not For Sale Act" to prevent law enforcement from buying people's online records, focusing on privacy protection.

This is about a law called the "Fourth Amendment Is Not For Sale Act." This law stops police and spy agencies from buying private information about you, like where you go online or where your phone is, from companies that aren't part of the government or from people who shouldn't have this information. Here's how it works:

  1. What it's for: It's meant to protect your private information from being bought by the government.
  2. What it covers: This includes info that can tell where you are, what you say in messages, or things about you that companies have because you use their services or because they tracked you somehow.
  3. What can't be done: Police and spy agencies can't buy your information. If a company collected your data in a sneaky way or broke their rules to get it, the law says the government can't use that info.
  4. Rules for sharing: Government offices that aren't police or spy agencies can't share your private info with those police or spies if they got that info by buying it.
  5. If the rules are broken: If the government gets your info in a way it's not supposed to, they can't use it in court against you or for anything else.

The idea is to make sure that private details about you aren't sold to the government and then used in a way that could be bad for you.

418 votes
Yes219
No199
Not Voting12
Apr 17, 2024, 05:48 PM (Washington D.C.)
0
  1. Received in the Senate.
  2. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
  3. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 219 - 199, 1 Present (Roll no. 136).
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  4. Passed/agreed to in House On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 219 - 199, 1 Present (Roll no. 136).
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  5. The House adopted the amendments en gross as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.
  6. The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
  7. The House rose from the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 4639.
  8. The House resolved into Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for further consideration.
  9. Considered as unfinished business.
  10. Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union rises leaving H.R. 4639 as unfinished business.
  11. On motion that the committee rise Agreed to by voice vote.
  12. Mr. Davidson moved that the committee rise.
  13. POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS - At the conclusion of debate on the LaLota amendment No. 3, the Chair put the question on agreeing to the amendment and by voice vote, announced that the noes had prevailed. Mr. LaLota demanded a recorded vote, and the Chair postponed further proceedings until a time to be announced.
  14. DEBATE - Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 1149, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the LaLota amendment No. 3.
  15. DEBATE - Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 1149, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Higgins (LA) amendment No. 2.
  16. DEBATE - Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 1149, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on the Davidson amendment No. 1.
  17. GENERAL DEBATE - The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one hour of general debate on H.R. 4639.
  18. The Speaker designated the Honorable Jerry L. Carl to act as Chairman of the Committee.
  19. House resolved itself into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 1149 and Rule XVIII.
  20. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6323, H. Res. 1143, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, H.R. 6046 and H.R. 4639. The resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 6323, H. Res. 1143, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, and H.R. 6046 under a closed rule, and for consideration of H.R. 4639 under a structured rule. The resolution provides for one hour of debate on each measure and one motion to recommit on H.R. 6323, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, H.R. 6046, and H.R. 4639.
  21. Reported in House

    After reviewing both documents thoroughly, the changes in the current version of the document compared to the previous version are as follows:

    1. The section on "Required Disclosure" (Section 3) has been removed entirely from the current version. In the previous version, this section detailed the conditions under which a governmental entity could require a third party to disclose covered customer or subscriber records or illegitimately obtained information, along with the process for obtaining court orders for such disclosures.

    2. The rest of the document, including sections on the protection of records held by data brokers, intermediary service providers, limits on surveillance conducted for foreign intelligence purposes other than under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, and limits on civil immunity for providing information, facilities, or technical assistance to the government absent a court order, remains the same between both versions, without any changes to text, definitions, or legal stipulations observed.

    Thus, the essential change is the removal of the "Required Disclosure" section in the current version, simplifying the legal framework around the conditions and process for governmental entities obtaining certain records and information for intelligence or law enforcement purposes.

  22. Introduced in House

    This is the "Fourth Amendment Is Not For Sale Act," which stops law enforcement and intelligence agencies from buying our personal information from data brokers without our okay.

    Here's how it works:

    • It defines "covered customer or subscriber record" as personal information that is shared or collected by third parties from our online accounts or devices.
    • It explains that "covered person" means anyone in the United States or U.S. citizens outside the country.
    • "Covered record" means any record or information about a covered person, including the content of communications or where we are located.
    • It introduces the term "illegitimately obtained information," which means personal information that was collected by tricking someone or without permission.
    • Law enforcement and intelligence agencies cannot get our personal information from third parties in exchange for money or other benefits.
    • If a government agency gets our personal information in a way that isn't allowed, they can't use it as evidence in court.
    • The Attorney General must create rules to make sure that information obtained wrongly is not kept or shared.

    In short, this act makes sure our private information, like where we are or what we say online, can't be bought by the government without proper legal process.