House Republicans Pass Act to Toughen Sanctions on Iran for Terrorism Support

House Republicans passed the Iran Counterterrorism Act, which makes it harder for the U.S. to ease sanctions on Iran unless it stops supporting terrorism or meets certain conditions, including a strict process for Congress to review and potentially reject such waivers.

This is the "Iran Counterterrorism Act of 2023." This bill introduces stricter rules for how the U.S. can waive (or lift) sanctions on Iran's financial sector. Here's what it does:

  1. The President can only waive sanctions if Iran stops supporting terrorism or if there's a strong reason beneficial to the U.S. national security.
  2. Before waiving sanctions for national security reasons, the President must tell Congress.
  3. Congress gets 30 days (or 60 days during certain periods in the year) to review and discuss the President's decision to waive sanctions.
  4. During this review time, the President can't lift the sanctions unless Congress agrees through a specific process.
  5. If Congress doesn't agree and passes a "disapproval" resolution, the President cannot lift the sanctions.

This law adds more oversight and steps the President must follow before he can lift sanctions on Iran's financial sector, ensuring Congress has a say in the process.

418 votes
Yes271
No147
Not Voting13
Apr 17, 2024, 06:14 PM (Washington D.C.)
0
  1. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
  2. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 271 - 147 (Roll no. 140).
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  3. Passed/agreed to in House On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 271 - 147 (Roll no. 140).
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  4. Considered as unfinished business.
  5. POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS - At the conclusion of debate on H.R. 6323, the Chair put the question on passage of the bill and announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. McHenry demanded the yeas and nays and the Chair postponed further proceedings until a time to be announced.
  6. The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
  7. DEBATE - The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H.R. 6323.
  8. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6323, H. Res. 1143, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, H.R. 6046 and H.R. 4639. The resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 6323, H. Res. 1143, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, and H.R. 6046 under closed rules, and for consideration of H.R. 4639 under a structured rule. The resolution provides for one hour of debate on each measure and one motion to recommit on H.R. 6323, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, H.R. 6046, and H.R. 4639.
  9. Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 1149.
  10. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1149 Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6323, H. Res. 1143, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, H.R. 6046 and H.R. 4639. The resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 6323, H. Res. 1143, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, and H.R. 6046 under a closed rule, and for consideration of H.R. 4639 under a structured rule. The resolution provides for one hour of debate on each measure and one motion to recommit on H.R. 6323, H.R. 4691, H.R. 5947, H.R. 6046, and H.R. 4639.
  11. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on Financial Services. H. Rept. 118-458, Part I.
  12. Reported in House

    The current bill introduces an additional action during the legislative process before a waiver regarding sanctions on Iran's financial sector can be issued. It changes the requirement that the President can only issue a waiver if a joint resolution of approval is enacted, removing previous conditions that allowed issuing the waiver unless a disapproval resolution was enacted after veto consideration and timing limitations on actions during presidential reconsideration.

    • Earlier, a joint resolution of disapproval needed to pass both Houses of Congress, and there were specific waiting periods post-passage or veto before the President could issue the waiver (12 days after passage or 10 days post-veto).
    • Now, the President must wait for a joint resolution of approval to be enacted, without mention of a disapproval resolution or the timing restrictions formerly included.

    This means the process for issuing a waiver is more stringent, focusing on obtaining explicit approval rather than preventing disapproval, making it potentially more challenging to issue waivers related to Iran's financial sector sanctions.

  13. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 380.
  14. Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged.
  15. Ordered to be Reported in the Nature of a Substitute (Amended) by the Yeas and Nays: 30 - 19.
  16. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session Held
  17. Introduced in House

    This is about a law called the "Iran Counterterrorism Act of 2023," which changes rules about lifting sanctions on Iran's financial sector.

    1. Before, the President could lift sanctions if they thought it was good for U.S. safety. Now, they can only do this if Iran stops supporting terrorism or if there's a strong reason for U.S. safety.
    2. Congress now gets a report about why lifting a sanction is suggested, and they have 30 or 60 days to look at it, depending on the time of year.
    3. If Congress doesn't agree with lifting a sanction, the President has to wait 12 days after Congress says no or 10 days if the President tries to override this decision and still gets a no.
    4. If Congress really disagrees, the President cannot lift the sanction.
    5. This law also talks about how Congress can say yes or no to these decisions through a specific process, including how fast they need to act and how they discuss it.
  18. Referred to the Committee on Financial Services, and in addition to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.