House GOP Passes Bill to Sanction Foreigners Over ICC Actions Against U.S. and Allies

House Republicans passed a bill that allows penalties on foreign people involved in any acts by the International Criminal Court (ICC) against individuals from the U.S. and its allies. This includes fines, blocking their property, and denying them entry into the U.S. Penalties are enforceable if the foreign people do not comply. The sanctions can be lifted if the ICC stops these actions.

This is a bill that requires the President of the United States to take certain actions against the International Criminal Court (ICC) if it tries to investigate, arrest, detain, or prosecute any protected Americans or people from allied countries. If the ICC tries to take such actions, the President must, within 60 days, impose two types of sanctions:

  1. Property blocking: All property and property interests of involved foreign individuals in the U.S. are to be frozen, meaning the owners cannot use or move them.
  2. Visa and entry bans: Involved foreign individuals cannot enter the U.S., and their existing visas or entry documents will be immediately revoked.

These sanctions also apply to direct family members of the sanctioned individuals. The bill also states that if someone tries to break these rules or helps others break them, they will face legal penalties similar to those for other serious breaches of economic laws.

The President must also inform specific groups within Congress about any sanctions imposed within 10 days and can remove the sanctions if the ICC stops trying to take action against protected persons.

402 votes
Yes247
No155
Not Voting27
Jun 04, 2024, 04:40 PM (Washington D.C.)
0
  1. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
  2. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 247 - 155, 2 Present (Roll no. 242).
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  3. Passed/agreed to in House On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 247 - 155, 2 Present (Roll no. 242).
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  4. Considered as unfinished business.
  5. POSTPONED PROCEEDINGS - At the conclusion of debate on H.R. 8282, the Chair put the question on passage of the bill and by voice vote announced that the ayes had prevailed. Mr. McCaul demanded the yeas and nays and the Chair postponed further proceedings until a time to be announced.
  6. The previous question was ordered pursuant to the rule.
  7. DEBATE - The House proceeded with one hour of debate on H.R. 8282.
  8. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 8580 and H.R. 8282. The resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 8580 under a structured rule and H.R. 8282 under a closed rule. Rule provides for one hour of general debate and one motion to recommit on each bill.
  9. Considered under the provisions of rule H. Res. 1269.
  10. Rule H. Res. 1269 passed House.
  11. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1269 Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 8580 and H.R. 8282. The resolution provides for consideration of H.R. 8580 under a structured rule and H.R. 8282 under a closed rule. Rule provides for one hour of general debate and one motion to recommit on each bill.
  12. Introduced in House

    This is a bill that requires the President of the United States to take certain actions against the International Criminal Court (ICC) if it tries to investigate, arrest, detain, or prosecute any protected Americans or people from allied countries. If the ICC tries to take such actions, the President must, within 60 days, impose two types of sanctions:

    1. Property blocking: All property and property interests of involved foreign individuals in the U.S. are to be frozen, meaning the owners cannot use or move them.
    2. Visa and entry bans: Involved foreign individuals cannot enter the U.S., and their existing visas or entry documents will be immediately revoked.

    These sanctions also apply to direct family members of the sanctioned individuals. The bill also states that if someone tries to break these rules or helps others break them, they will face legal penalties similar to those for other serious breaches of economic laws.

    The President must also inform specific groups within Congress about any sanctions imposed within 10 days and can remove the sanctions if the ICC stops trying to take action against protected persons.

  13. Referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
  14. Introduced in House